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New York Yacht Club (U.S.)

Last modified: 2020-01-04 by rick wyatt
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[New York Yacht club pennant] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008



See also:


New York Yacht Club

New York Yacht Club: (Burgee) - blue, a red cross with in the centre a white five-pointed star.
Source: Norie and Hobbs (1987)
Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 12 November 2001

The burgee isn't pictured. In the American Yacht List 1874 it's pictured as the pennant. On the web site of the NYYC (www.nyyc.com) it says about the adoption of the burgee:
"The club's first annual meeting took place at Windhams Tavern on March 17, 1845, during which the membership elected a full slate of officers. Commodore Stevens was reelected; Vice Commodore was Hamilton Wilkes; Corresponding Secretary, George B. Rollins; Recording Secretary, John C. Jay; Treasurer, William Edgar. These officers directed the Secretary to design a club burgee, and the present distinctive burgee of a red cross with a white star in the center on a dark blue background was adopted the following June."
www.nyyc.org/history/article_8/

Judging from the website, currently the burgee looks to be a very dark blue field with a red cross throughout with on its centre a white five-pointed star.

Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 15 September 2009


Rank flags of the New York Yacht Club based on REEDs Handbuch Maritime Flaggen,
edited by Miranda DELMAR_MORGAN ISBN :978 -3-613-50540-7 (Publ. Pietsch); p.37

Commodore flag

[New York Yacht club - commodore flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008

It is a dark blue flag divided by a red centred cross with a white 5-point star in its centre. In the canton are three white 5-point stars ordered one over two.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008


Vice Commodore flag

[New York Yacht club - vice commodore flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008

It is a dark blue flag divided by a red centred cross with a white 5-point star in its centre. In the canton are two white 5-point stars ordered in a row.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008


Rear Commodore flag

[New York Yacht club - rear commodore flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008

It is a dark blue flag divided by a red centred cross with a white 5-point star in its centre. In the centre of the canton is a white 5-point star.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008


Past Commodore flag

[New York Yacht club - past commodore flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008

It is a dark blue swallow tail pennant divided by a red centred cross with a white 5-point star in its centre.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008


Fleet Captain flag

[New York Yacht club - fleet captain flag] image by Peter Edwards, 30 August 2017

Rectangle. Same design as burgee with a white fouled anchor bend-wise in upper hoist quarter.
Source: NYYC Yearbook, 2015.
Peter Edwards, 30 August 2017


Flag of the Regatta Committee

[New York Yacht club - regatta committee flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008

It is a dark blue flag divided with a red anchor with rope in its centre. The anchor is flanked by white capitals 'R' and 'C'.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 10 September 2008


Race Committee flag

[New York Yacht club - race committee flag] image by Peter Edwards, 30 August 2017

Rectangle. Same design as burgee with a vertical red fouled anchor between white letters R and C in upper hoist quarter.
". . . NYYC Race Committee flag can be displayed when a Race Committee member is onboard a yacht . ."
Sources: Quote (above), NYYC's Curator of Collections, Ms. Alice Dickinson.
Other quotes and images, NYYC Yearbook, 2015.
Peter Edwards, 30 August 2017


Member Aboard flag

[New York Yacht club - race committee flag] image by Peter Edwards, 30 August 2017

Rectangle. Same design as burgee.
"A member may display the Member Aboard flag when aboard a yacht not owned by the member . . . [it] shall be displayed from the starboard main spreader only subordinate to a quarantine flag and to burgees of clubs founded prior to July 30, 1844. When a courtesy flag is flown the 'Member Aboard' flag is flown from the port main spreader."
Source: NYYC Yearbook, 2015.
Peter Edwards, 30 August 2017


Officer flags 1891

Commodore flag

[New York Yacht club - 1891 commodore flag] image by Peter Edwards, 14 August 2018

Commodore: Broad Pennant: circa 3:5 and 3:3 to crutch (print image).
Blue field charged with a white fouled anchor (per bend) circled with 13 white stars.
Peter Edwards, 14 August 2018


Vice Commodore flag

Vice Commodore: same design as Commodore except with red field.
Peter Edwards, 14 August 2018

Rear Commodore flag

Rear Commodore: same design as Commodore except with white field and red stars.
Peter Edwards, 14 August 2018

Acting Commodore flag

Acting Commodore: blue field only.
Peter Edwards, 14 August 2018


Private Signal: General Charles J. Paine

[New York Yacht club - private signal] image by Rob Raeside, 13 April 2019

Broad pennant. circa 5:8 and 5:6 to crutch (print image). Blue field charged with a red St. George's cross on a white lozenge.
Source: Manning, Thomas. The American Yacht List. New York, 1891.

"Paine was born August 26, 1833, in Boston, Massachusetts, son of Charles Cushing Paine and Fannie Cabot Jackson, and great-grandson of Robert Treat Paine, one of the signers of the United States Declaration of Independence. His brother, Sumner Edward Jackson Paine, was a 2nd Lieutenant in Company A, 20th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and was killed during the repulse of Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, at the Battle of Gettysburg. He graduated from Harvard in 1853 and made a considerable fortune in railroad enterprises. In 1861 he entered the Federal service as a captain in the 22nd Massachusetts Infantry. The next year he was sent to Ship Island, Mississippi. In October, he was commissioned as the first colonel of the 2nd Louisiana Infantry. During the siege of Port Hudson (May 24–July 8, 1863) he commanded a brigade. On March 4, 1864, Paine resigned his commission and returned to Massachusetts. The following July, he again entered the service as a brigadier general. On September 29, Paine led a division of black troops at New Market Heights, located south of Richmond, Virginia. Paine participated in both expeditions against Fort Fisher (December 1864/January 1865), although his troops played only a minor role. His division was however more actively engaged during the following Battle of Wilmington. After the war, he served briefly as the district commander at New Berne, and managed to arrange the retrieval of Robert Gould Shaw's captured sword, so that it could be returned to the bereaved family. On January 15, 1866, he was brevetted as a major general of volunteers.
During his later years, Paine took a great interest in yachting. He was the owner of the Puritan, the Mayflower, and the Volunteer, each of which successfully defended the America's cup against a British challenger. Paine was one of the oarsmen in the first boat race between Harvard and Yale (August 1852), which was the first inter-collegiate sporting event in North America. He would be one of the charter members of The Country Club (Brookline, Massachusetts), the prototype of country clubs everywhere, and built one of the first golf courses in North America in Weston, Massachusetts. He reputedly played with red golf balls, so as to be able to find them in the winter among the snowdrifts. Paine helped finance the founding of Middlesex School (Concord, Massachusetts), of which his son-in-law Frederick Winsor was the founder and first headmaster. Paine's interest in sports continued into the next generation: two of his sons, John B. and Sumner, won pistol-shooting events at the first modern Olympic Games (Athens 1896).”
Source: accessed 10 April 2019,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Jackson_Paine
Note: New York Times Obituary, accessed 10 April 2019,
https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1916/08/15/104685538.pdf
Peter Edwards, 13 April 2019